Monday, April 17, 2006

Happiness lessons

Can you believe that British schools are actually offering happiness lessons.
"We have been focusing too much on academics and missing something far more important." said Anthony Seldon, master of Wellington College, in Crowthorne, Berkshire, west of London.
These classes are offered to students aged from 14 to 16. They will be given a lesson every week. The class teaches basic learning skills such as, managing relationships (if you are ever in one), physical and mental health, negative emoitons and how to achive you amibitions.
I personally think this is soooo cool. But i don't think that its going to work. Considering that happiness lies in ones soul. I mean there are classes on everthing today, like depression and what not. But no one can't actually solve the problems at ones house. all, anybody can do is give some comfort of the time being.
Happiness lies in your heart, and until your heart is not pure, i dont think you will be able to feel that happiness inside you.
To be happy, you need to feel happy, not just act happy.

The Top Five

The top five television shows, Movies and songs of the month noted by the billboard magazine.
Television
1. "American Idol" (Tuesday), Fox.
2. "American Idol" (Wednesday), Fox.
3. "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," CBS.
4. "House," Fox.
5. "Deal Or No Deal" (Monday), NBC.
Movies
1. "Ice Age: The Meltdown," Fox.
2. "The Benchwarmers," Sony.
3. "Take the Lead," New Line.
4. "Inside Man," Universal.
5. "Lucky Number Slevin," MGM-Weinstein.
Songs
1. "Bad Day," Daniel Powter. Warner Bros.
2. "Temperature," Sean Paul. VP.
3. "What You Know," T.I. Grand Hustle.
4. "You're Beautiful," James Blunt. Custard. (Platinum)
5. "Be Without You," Mary J. Blige. Geffen. (Platinum)

Baby Battle

Angeline Jolie and Brad Pitt are planning to have thier baby in South African and are also planning to give the baby a Namibian name.

Eminems Catastrophe

"You don't know where to begin when you lose somebody who's been such a big part of your life for so long. Proof and I were brothers," Eminem, who rapped alongside Proof in the group D12, said in the statement. "He pushed me to become who I am. Without Proof's guidance and encouragement, there would have been a Marshall Mathers, but probably not an Eminem and certainly never a Slim Shady.
"Right now, there's a lot of people focusing on the way he died. I want to remember the way he lived. Proof was funny, he was smart, he was charming. He inspired everyone around him. He can never, ever be replaced. He was, and always, will be, my best friend."
For those who don't know, a 32-year old Proof, real name Deshaun Holton, was shot in the head at 4:30 a.m. on April 10-06 near a bar on 8 mile road.

Tuesday, April 11, 2006

Deep Mud Slows Philippine Search Effort: An elementary school was swamped by a massive landslide that buried a town in Philippines and killed 1,800 people on Saturday Feb. 18, 2006.
Survivors and relatives of the missing had trouble even figuring out where houses once stood in the 100-acre stretch of mud.
"It's hard to find the houses now," said Eunerio Bagaipo, a 42-year-old farmer who lost two brothers, almost 20 nieces and nephews and a number of in-laws. "There is nothing now, just earth and mud."
Rescures tried to find surviors, but the search was complicated since the nearby mountain remained unstable, and that 750 troops, firefighters, and volunteers could get sucked down in the soft mud.

Crowds Line Up for $365 Million Powerball: What would happen if you won $365 million dollars? What would you do with it? Even thinking about having $1 million dollars makes me want to dance my feet off.
Well, that dream did come true for five people in Omaha, Neb..,
I figure somebody is going to win it, so it might as well be me," said Casey Symonds after buying $25 worth of tickets for himself and four co-workers Friday. The chances of winning the jackpot by matching all six numbers were 1 in 146.1 million.

Another Silver Lining for Cohen: Michelle Kwan was not in the olympics this year due to an injury. so in place of her, 21 year old, a two-time world and four-time US runner-up, Cohen claimed the national title this year. Although she could have won the gold metal if she had'nt fell on her opening triple and struggled in her second.
" It's bittersweet," Cohen said. "I tried hard. I have no regrets."I definitely didn't think I was going to get any medal when I finished. So it was a nice surprise.""Of course I was disappointed and in shock. But you've got to take what life gives you."No, I didn't cry. I don't usually cry unless I'm angry. I'm not angry, it's more of a letdown."It's one night, four minutes and a piece of metal. It's more about the journey over the four years, it's not a one-night journey."

Gov't Report Finds Fewer ID Theft Victims: An estimated 3.6 million U.S. households are victims of identity theft. The more frequent victims of identiy theft are people from ages of 18 to 24, and those with income of at least $ 75000. When being cautious about identity theft, look for Unauthorized use of a credit card, use of an existing account such as a cell phone or bank account or even a misuse of someone's personal information to open a new account or get a loan.

Carroll Reunited With Family in Boston: The 28-year-old Christian Science Monitor reporter was held as a hostage in Iraq for 82 days. She was back with her parents and a twin sister in U.S. on April 02, 2006.
"I finally feel like I am alive again. I feel so good," Carroll said. "To be able to step outside anytime, to feel the sun directly on your face — to see the whole sky. These are luxuries that we just don't appreciate every day."

Sunday, April 02, 2006

Gov't Report Finds Fewer ID Theft Victims

WASHINGTON - An estimated 3.6 million U.S. households — or about three out of every 100 — reported being victims of identity theft, according to a government study that counted misuse of someone else's cell phone, credit card or personal information.
The figures released Sunday by the Justice Department differ from findings of a previous Federal Trade Commission study that estimated 9.3 million victims of the crime for the same period.
The department said the most frequent victims of identity theft were households headed by people age 18 to 24; those in urban or suburban areas; and those with incomes of at least $75,000.
The study was based on interviews with members of 42,000 randomly selected households over the last half of 2004, said Katrina Baum, a statistician with the Bureau of Justice Statistics.
The bureau defined identity theft in three ways:
_Unauthorized use of a credit card.
_Unauthorized use of an existing account such as a cell phone or bank account.
_Misuse of someone's personal information to open a new account, get a loan or commit some other crime.
Of the 3.6 million victimized households, the study said:
_An estimated 1.7 million discovered unauthorized use of credit cards during the six-month period. That is about 48 percent of households reporting identity theft crimes and 1.5 percent of all U.S. households.
_About 900,000 households experienced theft from other types of existing accounts, such as a cell phone account, bank account or debit-checking account. That is about a quarter of households with thefts and 0.8 percent of all U.S. households.
_Roughly 540,000 households said someone had misused personal information of someone in the home to open new accounts, get loans or commit other crimes. That was 15 percent of households reporting identify theft and 0.5 percent of all U.S. households.
The last category, and the rarest, is the one the financial services industry more often defines as identity theft.
"I think it's important to mentally distinguish between transactional fraud ... (like) the unauthorized use of a credit card, and identity theft, which involves the misuse of information to establish new accounts," said Anne Wallace, executive director of the Identity Theft Assistance Corporation. The industry-funded group helps victims resolve fraud problems for free.
An earlier report by the Federal Trade Commission estimated about 10.1 million people experienced identity theft in 2003 and 9.3 million in 2004. The Justice Department said the different results may be due to differences in the methods used to collect the data, the period of time considered and counting methods.
The department's study included questions on identity theft in a larger survey covering burglaries or other crimes a household may experiences. Some 6 percent of victimized households reported more than one episode of identity theft in the six-month period, and in those cases the survey only asked about the most recent incident.
The department estimated the loss to households due to identity theft at $3.2 billion. That total included money that may have been reimbursed by others, such as credit card companies or insurers.

Carroll Reunited With Family in Boston

BOSTON - Journalist Jill Carroll was back on U.S. soil Sunday, tearfully embracing her parents and twin sister after 82 days as a hostage in
Iraq' that she said gave her a deep appreciation for the myriad simple joys of freedom.

"I finally feel like I am alive again. I feel so good," Carroll said. "To be able to step outside anytime, to feel the sun directly on your face — to see the whole sky. These are luxuries that we just don't appreciate every day."
The 28-year-old Christian Science Monitor reporter arrived at Boston's Logan International Airport just after noon, and was quickly driven away in a police-escorted limousine to the newspaper's headquarters.
She didn't step out into public view, but reports on the Monitor's Web site, along with photos, showed a joyful and tearful reunion with her parents and twin sister.

Thursday, March 30, 2006

Hate Radio

I read this story but i just don't understand it. I am soo soorry. This story is really confusing.

Sunday, March 26, 2006

Inside Man: Movie Review

Four people dressed in painters' outfits march into the busy lobby of Manhattan Trust, a cornerstone Wall Street Branch of a worldwide financial institution. Within seconds, the costumed robbers place the bank under a surgically planned siege, and the 50 patrons and staff become unwitting pawns in an airtight heist. NYPD hostage negotiators Detectives Keith Frazier and Bill Mitchell are dispatched to the scene with orders to establish contact with the heist's ringleader, Dalton Russell, and ensure safe release of the hostages. Working alongside Emergency Services Unit (ESU) Captain John Darius, all are hopeful that the situation can be peacefully diffused and that control of the bank and release of those inside can be secured in short order. But Russell proves an unexpectedly canny opponent--clever, calm and totally in command--a puppet master with a meticulous plan to disorient and confuse not only the hostages, but also the authorities. Outside, the crowd of New Yorkers grows as the situation becomes increasingly intense tense, with Frazier's superiors becoming more concerned about his ability to keep the standoff from spiraling out of control. The robbers appear to consistently be one step ahead of the police, outwitting Frazier and Mitchell at every turn. Frazier's suspicions that more is at work than anyone perceives are justified with the entry of Madeline White, a power player with shadowy objectives, who requests a private meeting with Russell. The chairman of the bank's board of directors, controlling entrepreneur Arthur Case, is also uniquely interested in the moment-to-moment happenings inside the branch. But just what are the robbers after? Why has nothing worked to alleviate the standoff, which stretches on hour after hour? Frazier is convinced that invisible strings are being pulled and secret negotiations are taking place as the powder keg situation grows more unstable by the moment.

World's Best Paid Athetes

Andre Agassi
Age: 35
Sport: TennisEarnings: $26.2 million*
Despite recent injuries and time off, the 35-year-old, eight-time Grand Slam champion isn't ready to give up. Of course, his quarterfinal performance at the 2005 U.S. Open--he lost in five sets to fellow American James Blake--proved he doesn't need to. While the talent is still there, Agassi's logo has changed. After sporting the Nike swoosh for well over a decade, the tennis sensation signed a long-time partnership with Adidas in July 2005.

Lance Armstrong
Age: 34
Sport: CyclingEarnings: $28 million*
He may be a seven-time Tour de France winner, but it is Armstrong's high-profile split with fiancé and Grammy-winner Sheryl Crow that gets all of the attention lately. The recently retired cancer survivor devotes much of his time to his philanthropic pursuits.

David Beckham
Age: 30
Sport: SoccerEarnings: $32.5 million*
Soccer's golden boy left Manchester United for the riches of Real Madrid in 2003. And though his new team has been unlucky on the field, the star midfielder is still soccer's highest-paid player off the field. Indeed, Beckham earns $24 million from endorsements.

Kobe Bryant
Age: 27
Sport: BasketballEarnings: $28.8 million*
Despite a public image that took a beating due to a rape charge that has since been dropped and a high-profile feud with former teammate Shaquille O'Neal, the L.A. Lakers star can still wow. Earlier this year, Bryant scored an astonishing 81 points against Toronto. Feats like these explain why Nike launched a signature shoe, dubbed Zoom Kobe I, for him.

Jeff Gordon
Age: 34
Sport: Auto RacingEarnings: $23.4 million*
Add Gordon's prize earnings to his endorsement deals--including those with Pepsi, DuPont and Tag Heuer--and it's no surprise the four-time NASCAR champion raked in $23.4 million. Despite the defending champ's disappointing Daytona 500 finish this year, the racing legend will continue to pull in the big bucks.

LeBron James
Age: 21
Sport: BasketballEarnings: $22.9 million*
James, who skipped college to go pro in 2003, has proven his all-star ability with the Cleveland Cavaliers. Between his astounding stats and a hefty endorsement portfolio--which include Nike, Upper Deck and Coca-Cola--the 6-foot-8 forward earned close to $23 million. Of course, his wallet is sure to grow even thicker when he renews his contracts next year.

Michael Jordan
Age: 43
Sport: BasketballEarnings: $33 million*
Arguably the greatest basketball player of all time, Jordan ended a career of 15 full seasons in 2003. Of course, the money still flows in thanks to endorsement deals with Nike and others.

Shaquille O'Neal
Age: 34
Sport: BasketballEarnings: $33.4 million*
O'Neal, or simply "Shaq," seems at peace in the Florida sun, playing for the Miami Heat--at least that's what the much-hyped handshakes and hugs with nemesis and former teammate Kobe Bryant indicated earlier this year. Despite a recent ankle injury, the 7-footer proves he's still in the game after some 13 seasons in the NBA.

Michael Schumacher
Age: 37
Sport: Auto RacingEarnings: $60 million*
Schumacher, a seven-time Formula One world champion, is coping with difficulties. For the first time in six years, he kicked off a racing season without a number one mounted on his Ferrari. The German racing legend watched his income drop as Ferrari struggled with new rules and tire problems.

Tiger Woods
Age: 30
Sport: GolfEarnings: $87 million*
After a brief rocky period--Woods did not win a major in 2003 or 2004--the golfing sensation returned to form during the 2005 PGA Tour season. Among his many feats, Wood's broke his majors "drought" with a win at the 2005 Masters--his fourth Masters victory and tenth major golf championship.

Friday, February 24, 2006

Another Silver Lining for Cohen

TURIN, Italy (AFP) - Sasha Cohen had to settle for another silver medal to remind her of yet another golden opportunity that slipped through her fingers.
A two-time world and four-time US runner-up she claimed the national title this year in the absence of the injured Michelle Kwan.Turin was supposed to be her big international breakthrough.
But like the 2003 and 2004 nationals, the 2004 worlds, and four years ago in Salt Lake City Olympics, she had a chance to medal or win in the free skate but failed to rise to the occasion.
She was leading after the short programme.
But once again under the spotlight failed to deliver.
Her Olympic challenge was over within seconds as the 21-year-old fell on her opening triple and struggled in her second.
After completing her "Romeo and Juliet" routine she went backstage, took off her dress and skates, convinced that she would not be needing them again.
But the poor performance of world champion Irina Slutskaya allowed the American to claim silver behind Japan's Shizuka Arakawa, the 2004 world champion, with the Russian taking bronze.
" It's bittersweet," Cohen said. "I tried hard. I have no regrets.
"I definitely didn't think I was going to get any medal when I finished. So it was a nice surprise."
"Of course I was disappointed and in shock. But you've got to take what life gives you.
"No, I didn't cry. I don't usually cry unless I'm angry. I'm not angry, it's more of a letdown.
"It's one night, four minutes and a piece of metal. It's more about the journey over the four years, it's not a one-night journey."
Cohen brushed off suggestions that she was suffering another injury.
She had been bidding to follow in the footsteps of fellow Americans Tara Lipinski (1998) and Sarah Hughes (2002) as the Olympic champion.
She did keep the US on the women's podium for the 11th straight Olympics.
Her silver was the eighth ever by an American woman and the second for the United States here in Turin after Tanith Belbin and Ben Agosto came second in the ice dance.
Work Cited: Article Written by: Yahoo sports

Best Spring Break Hangouts

Midterms getting you down? The pressures of classes, activities and the looming real world driving you mad? For many, spring break is the solution to these problems. Swarms of college-aged kids descend on areas ranging from Florida to the Caribbean in search of sun, beach and a sea of peers ready to get their groove on all night long. For those looking for that kind of experience, options abound — complete with booze cruises, dance contests and absurd beach games. But there is also plenty of fun for those not longing for six nights of debauchery. So whether you're a spring break virgin or a returning champion, read on for the hottest spring break spots.
The top ten picks for spring Break spots are:
1. Panama City, FL
2. Cancun, Mexico
3. South Padre Island, texas
4. Jamaica
5. Lake Havasu, Arizona
6. Mazatian, Mexico
7. Daytona Beach, Florida
8. Key West, Florida
9. Rosarito Beach/ Ensenada, Mexico
10. The Bahamas
Work Cited: Article written by Jennifer Plum

Saturday, February 18, 2006

Crowds Line Up for $365 Million Powerball

People with dreams of winning Saturday's record $365 million Powerball lottery jackpot stood in lengthening lines to buy tickets that flew out of machines at dizzying speeds.
"I figure somebody is going to win it, so it might as well be me," said Casey Symonds of Omaha, Neb., after buying $25 worth of tickets for himself and four co-workers Friday. The chances of winning the jackpot by matching all six numbers were 1 in 146.1 million.
The Powerball jackpot topped the previous lottery record, which was $363 million for the Big Game — the forerunner of Mega Millions. That was won by two ticket holders in Illinois and Michigan in 2000. Powerball's previous record of $340 million was won by an Oregon family in October.
West Virginia retailers cranked out tickets at a rate of 29 per second on Friday, said Libby White, the lottery's marketing director. North Carolina and Virginia residents called the West Virginia lottery asking for directions to the closest retailer, she said.
Sales in South Carolina reached $11,000 a minute on Friday, "pretty staggering," said John C.B. Smith, chairman of the state's lottery commission.
The big buyers usually are people representing pools of co-workers, and some bought hundreds of tickets at a time, said Hope Travers, clerk at a 7-Eleven in Providence, R.I.
"They've been driving me nutty," she said.
Jerry Bono, a furniture mover from Omaha, said he averages $10 worth of Powerball tickets per week, but goes for the big jackpots and leaves the lesser games alone.
"If I lose, I lose, but if I ever hit, I'd get out of here and move to Las Vegas."
"I intend to go, perhaps, to Paris," Robert Sayon Morris said after buying a ticket at Billy and Marty's convenience store in Minneapolis. Would he quit his job at a bank? "Of course."
Powerball is played in 28 states plus the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It is run by the Multi-State Lottery Association based in Des Moines, Iowa.
Work Cited: yahoo news

Deep Mud Slows Philippine Search Effort

GUINSAUGON, Philippines - Hoping for a miracle, rescue workers in the Philippines searched for survivors Saturday in an elementary school swamped by a massive landslide that buried this town and killed some 1,800 people.
No more survivors were found, however, and reports that students and teachers sent cell phone text messages from inside went unconfirmed, leaving the search effort dispirited and empty-handed.
The landslide, which followed two weeks of heavy rains, was believed to have killed nearly every man, woman and child in the farming village of Guinsaugon, which was covered with mud up to 30 feet deep.
The situation was so delicate that a no-fly zone was established over the area out of concern that blasts of air from the helicopters' rotors could send the mud oozing again in Guinsaugon, about 400 miles southeast of the capital, Manila.
Only 57 people were plucked from the mud Friday from Guinsaugon's population of 1,857. At least 56 bodies were recovered.
Air Force Rescue Group said rescue workers shouted and used stones to bang on boulders in hopes that survivors would hear. There was only silence, he said..
Everyone's only hoping for "a miracle".
Survivors and relatives of the missing had trouble even figuring out where houses once stood in the 100-acre stretch of mud. Soldiers, firefighters and volunteers were given sketches of the village as it stood just days ago, but all the landmarks had been wiped away.
"It's hard to find the houses now," said Eunerio Bagaipo, a 42-year-old farmer who lost two brothers, almost 20 nieces and nephews and a number of in-laws. "There is nothing now, just earth and mud."
The search was complicated by heavy morning downpours, the threat that the mountain remained unstable and the possibility that 750 troops, firefighters and volunteers could get sucked down into the soft, shifting mud.
Many residents of the landslide area were evacuated last week due to the threat of landslides or flooding following the heavy rains, but had started returning home when the rains let up and days turned sunny.
In November 1991, about 6,000 people were killed on Leyte in floods and landslides triggered by a tropical storm. Another 133 people died in floods and mudslides there in December 2003.
Associated Press correspondent Oliver Teves contributed to this report from Guinsaugon.